Email Marketing
Guide

Lesson 9 – How To Write Compelling CTAs

Lesson 9

This topic is so important that I’ve decided to make it into a chapter of its own.

Not to say the other topics aren’t important. They are.

It’s just that without the CTA, everything you do will be a waste of time, money, and energy.

CTA = Call To Action

Which basically means to persuade people to do what you want them to do -- let’s call this your “goal”.

It could be asking them to:

  • Check out your latest blog post

  • Watch your latest video

  • Buy your brand new course

  • Try out your new service for free

  • Asking them for constructive feedback

  • Asking them for testimonials

  • Etc

No CTA = No clicks = No goal!

Here are a few best practices you want to follow when it comes to CTA inside emails:

  • Use a CTA button

  • There should only be “1 purpose/goal” CTA inside an email

  • You can have multiple repeats of the same “purpose/goal” CTA inside the email, as long as the objective of the CTA stays the same

  • The CTA text should be “motivating/enticing” and clear

  • Create a sense of urgency

  • Use a blue line to underline the CTA

  • Make the CTA into a separate line on its own

  • Use visual cues

Let’s break it down one by one…

CTA Button

A button is visual, like an image that immediately stands out from the sea of text/words inside your email.

It’s going to catch the reader's attention more, and it’s going to catch their attention faster.

Hence there should at least be 1 CTA button in an email. But you also don’t want to overdo it. I recommend a maximum of 2 buttons.

And not just any kind of button, but a button that is EASILY NOTICEABLE and EYE CATCHING.

What this means is can you step 10 feet away from your computer screen and people can still quickly spot where to click?

1 “Purpose/Goal” CTA

There should only be 1 goal with every email you send.

No more. No less.

Having multiple goals means you’ll be asking subscribers to do different things.

Do you want me to check out your new video?

Or do you want me to follow you on Facebook?

Or do you want me to check out your brand new course?

This will confuse them.

And when they’re confused, they’ll just sit there and don’t take any action = No clicks = No goal!

With only 1 “purpose/goal” CTA -- e.g. to buy your brand new course -- it’s very clear what they should do -- they should click the link to go to check out the course.

Multiple Repeats Of The Same “Purpose/Goal” CTA

You can have multiple repeats of the same “purpose/goal” CTA inside an email, as long as the objective of the CTA is the same.

So somewhere near the beginning of the email body, you could have a CTA text that says:

See how this course can help you get at least an A on your math exam

Then in the middle/end you can have another CTA text that says:

Claim your free trial of “Math Super Powers” now

And near the end or in the P.S you could throw in a CTA button also.

The CTA Text Should Be “Motivating/Enticing” & Clear

Instead of “click here” or “check this out”, you should be using a more “motivating/enticing” text, as shown in the previous section, like…

See how this course can help you get at least an A on your math exam

Claim your free trial of “Math Super Powers” now

Use A Blue Line To Underline The CTA

In the early phases of the internet, the majority of website links were underlined with the blue color.

That has been passed on for decades and even to this day, people are still accustomed to clicking on text that are underlined in blue.

So if possible, underline your CTA link in blue color, instead of using, say, orange or red or gray.

Make The CTA Into A Separate Line On Its Own

Instead of having the CTA text in the middle or end of a sentence, it’s better to make it into a separate line on its own.

When readers scan (not read) your email content, the CTA becomes more visible.

---

Example of CTA text in the middle of a sentence:

So if you really want to confidently speak in public without any fear, check out this course.

Example of CTA text in a separate line on its own:

So if you really want to up your presentation skills and earn the praise from your boss…

Check out this course and confidently speak in public without any fear

---

To create variety, you don’t always 100% have to do this for every single CTA. For instance if you have 2 CTA text in your email, you could have one in the middle of a sentence and another one in a separate line on its own.

Use Visual Cues

Visual cues like arrows and hand-pointing emojis help direct the eyes of the reader.

Use these wisely to direct their eyes and attention to your CTA.

Or you could also insert a picture that includes a person where the eyes of that person is looking at the direction of your CTA, like this:

When people see this, they’ll think “what is that person looking at?” Then they try to put themselves in that person’s perspective and look at whatever direction he is looking at… which, of course, is your CTA.

>